Ty

cassandraclare:

commanderfraya said:  I just finished City of Heavenly Fire and I was struck by Ty’s character. I don’t know if you intended for him to be autistic or not, but given the behaviors described — his stimming/counting, expanded vocabulary, difficulty communicating, agitation, aversion to touch, and other sensory issues — he’s one of the best autistic representations I’ve ever seen, even if his character wasn’t originally intended that way. My younger brother and fiancee are both autistic, and it’s really difficult to find humanizing depictions of autistic people in media… If Ty is going to be a continuing character in The Dark Artifices then I’m all kinds of excited, and if not then I’m glad we got to know him in Heavenly Fire! Your work has meant a lot to me since I was thirteen years old, thank you for sharing your imagination and I hope you have a lovely day :)

Hi! I just wanted to post this to assure you that Ty is absolutely going to be a continuing character. He’s very significant in the Dark Artifices. He is important to the other characters, and they are important to him. 

Ty is a challenge because it’s a challenge to write a neuroatypical character in a world in which there are no words for neuroatypicality and no acknowledgement that it exists. I am grateful that so many readers have identified Ty as a person with autism even though I never used that word —largely readers who have autism themselves or know someone with autism.

There is no one way that people with autism behave or feel or are. I can only say that Ty is loving and great and very much himself. Ty is based in part on my stepbrother, who has autism, and shares several traits with Ty, though not all of them. His name isn’t Ty, for instance. It’s Will. :)

cassandraclare:

Ty

After reading the COHF prologue excerpt, I have the sense that Ty has Asperger’s Syndrome. Can you confirm this? I think that would be really cool because I’ve also dealt with Asperger’s in my life (it being the worst when I was about Ty’s age) so seeing you create a character also going through that is really assuring, for lack of a better word. Thanks so much if you can answer! ➰ — malec-chat

Hi Cassie, I love your books and I cannot wait for COHF. You are an amazingly talented author on and I have fallen deeply in love with your writing. Unfortunately I shall have to wait a while for the book, but in the mean time I have been satisfying my shadowhunting needs with #TMItuesday. I have just read the new snippet from the prologue and was wondering if Ty was autistic. I have family who work with autistic children and in the snippet and noticed Ty was showing a few autistic traits, so I was wondering whether or not he was autistic? — letmeliveinbooks
Yes, Ty places on the autistic spectrum. I’m glad that that was picked up as it is a part of his character. My stepbrother is autistic (I know there is debate within the neuroatypical community as to whether to say “autistic” or “person with autism” so I try to go with what people want to call themselves) and it is partly through that relationship that I decided that I would like to write a neuroatypical hero. Ty has a loving and supportive family but certainly lives within a society that is intolerant of difference, and which has a specific poor relationship with neuroatypicality among its members. Ty is a favorite of mine and a big part of TDA. I wanted to make it clear that he was just as intelligent and skilled, and just as worthy and capable of love, respect and admiration as his neurotypical peers, when he is struggling and when he is not, and I hope you will like him.